IU School of Medicine

Elective Title: 93ZH860 — HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Description:

This course surveys the history of public health (PH) from antiquity to the twenty-first century with the aim of providing students an understanding of how history may inform today

Elective Details:

Primary Contact for Add/Drops: Stephen Jay (sjay@iu.edu)

Director: Stephen Jay, M.D.

Campus: Indianapolis

Location: IUSM - Indianapolis

Learning Objectives

  • 1) Examine modern PH from an historical context and apply this information in evaluating contemporary PH issues (PBLI1)
  • 2) Summarize major historical determinants of modern PH theories and practice (PBLI1)
  • 3) Outline the historical social, scientific, economic, ethical, religious, and political context that has shaped the U)S) health care system (PBLI1)
  • 4) Review the roles played by Hoosier PH leaders in building 20th century health professions research, teaching, and health services infrastructure in America (PBLI1)
  • 5) Use historical knowledge and resources to advance their education, research, and practice in PH (PBLI1)

Assessment

  • Professional Development Evaluation Form; (Attendance; Mini-essays; Class Participation; Final exam)

Enrollment Information

Prerequisites: 3rd or 4th year status

Availability with Max Students per Month:

JuneJulyAugSeptOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay
000000009090

Duty Hours: 48-50

Time Distribution: 50% Exam; 40% Attendance and class participation; 10% Essay

Elective Type Category: PD - Professional Development

Notes and Enrollment Information:

M,W,F 8-10am. Course is also taught in a 16-week semester-based format during fall and spring terms, which requires Medical Student Affairs office approval. Contact Nancy Mitchell at 274-1973 for information.

Third Year Elective? Yes

Interprofessional Skills and Service Learning

Interprofessional Collaborative Skills: Yes

Skills Description: To foster thinking and exploring the questions about population health in a historical context students are encouraged to collaborate with their colleagues and faculty across disciplines, staff, and patients to address the complex medical, social, legal, economic, moral/ethical, challenges we face in Indiana, U.S. and globally. Only through interprofessional collaboration and also interactions with patients, community leaders and other non-professionals can the major public health threats we face in the future be addressed.

Service Learning Included: None