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DIMA


 

 
DIMA is a PDA application to assists end-state renal disease patients monitor their fluid and sodium intake. These patients can only consume one liter of fluid and a couple of grams of sodium each day. Failure to comply can lead to severe health complications or death. DIMA will allow patients to quickly input food they consume via a barcode scanner and receive immediate feedback on their nutritional intake levels.
 
Dialysis patients can only consume 1 liter of fluid and two grams of sodium each day. Currently, patients try to remember or write down in a food diary. However, these techniques are insufficient because 80% of patients are unable to restrict their fluid intake. If patients miscalculate their fluid intake they run the risk of hypertension, pulmonary edema, and death.
 
DIMA research focuses on creating a Dietary Intake Monitoring Application on a personal digital assistant (PDA) to assist dialysis patients accurately monitor their fluid and sodium intake. Our application will:

  • allow patients with reduced cognitive skills to easily record dietary information
  • allow patients to get immediate feedback on their fluid and sodium intake
  • reduce the stigma of disease as a medium for recording dietary information
  • assist researchers gain information about patient fluid and sodium compliance

 
Team: Beenish Chaudry, Kay Connelly, Josette Jones, Katie Siek, Janet Welch
 
Support: NIH (National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering), IU’s Faculty Research Support Program

 

Publications


 

  • Siek, K.A., Rogers, Y., and Connelly, K.H. (2005). Fat Finger Worries: How Older and Younger Users Physically Interact with PDAs. In the Proceedings of Interact 2005, LNCS 3585, p.267-280. (pdf)(ppt)
  • Moor [Siek], K.A., Connelly, K.H., and Rogers, Y. (2004). A Comparative Study of Elderly, Younger, and Chronically Ill Novice PDA Users. Computer Science Department, Indiana University, June 2004, TR 595.(pdf)
  • Siek, K.A., Connelly, K.H., and Rogers, Y. (2006) Pride and Prejudice: Learning How Chronically Ill People Think about Food. In Proceedings of CHI 2006. (pdf)
  • Connelly, K.H., Faber, A.M., Rogers, Y., Siek, K.A., and Toscos, T. (2006) Mobile Applications that Empower People to Monitor their Personal Health. In Springer E&I. (Request Paper)
  • Siek, K.A. and Connelly, K.H. (2005) Assistive Technologies for Dialysis Patients. Proceedings of Grace Hopper 2004 (GHC ’04), October 2004. (pdf)
  • Connelly, K.H., Siek, K.A., Rogers, Y., Jones, J., Kraus, M.A., Perkins, S., Trevino, L.L., and Welch, J.L. (2005) Designing a PDA Interface for Dialysis Patients to Monitor Diet in their Everyday Life. In the Proceedings of HCI International 2005. Paper. (pdf)
  • Siek, K.A. and Connelly, K.H. (2006) Lessons Learned Conducting User Studies in a Dialysis Ward. In Extended Abstracts of CHI 2006: Workshops – Reality Testing. (pdf)
  • Connelly, K.H., Siek, K.A. (Indiana University), Lafond-Favieres, V., and Bennett, G. (Georgia Institute of Technology). (2005) Planes, Pains, and Phosphorane: Usability Studies in Non-Traditional Environments. In the Adjunct Proceedings of Interact 2005. (pdf)
  • Bennett, G. (Georgia Tech), Connelly, K.H., Lindgaard, G. (Carleton University), Siek, K.A., Tsuji, B. (Carleton University). (2006) Reality Testing: HCI Challenges in Non-Traditional Environments. In the Adjunct Proceedings of CHI 2006. To Appear. (pdf)(Workshop Web Site)
  • Siek, K.A., Connelly, K.H., and Rogers, Y., Rohwer, P., Lambert, D., and Welch J.L. (2006) The Foods We Eat: An Evaluation of Food Items Input into an Electronic Food Monitoring Application. In Extended Abstracts of UbiComp: Workshops – UbiHealth 2006. (pdf)
  • Siek, K.A., Connelly, K.H., and Rogers, Y., Rohwer, P., Lambert, D., and Welch J.L. (2006) When do We Eat: An Evaluation of Food Items Input into an Electronic Food Monitoring Application. In Pervasive Healthcare Conference 2006.