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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (6696)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Myers Hall 130
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10019)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen Joseph
Day & Time: MW 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 102
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 102 CLIMATE CHANGE-INTL STUDIES (31417)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Swain East 105
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Climate change is a cross-cutting contemporary problem: it intersects with issues of culture and politics, conflict, security, human rights, development, and governance. This class explores the basic science and policy of climate change, along with these intersections.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (6308)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1128
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (11369)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1118
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (11712)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 150
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Why are some countries rich while other countries remain poor? What is the effect of "globalization" on development at the local and national level? Who are the actors and institutions, and what are the challenges and strategies in addressing global poverty, inequality, and development? We will explore the political, economic, social and cultural forces and effects of global development. While we will focus on "developing" countries, we will continue to reference "developed" countries to compare trajectories and outcomes related to human development. We will consider the role of markets, geography, violent conflict, domestic governance structures, and institutions and organizations in our exploration of the causes and consequences of development. I-203 is the core course for the International Studies thematic concentration in Global Development.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (10465)

Instructor: Hunt, Katherine Eugene LeBreton
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (11370)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Hutton Honors College 111
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12050)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM - 6:35 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (13886)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter Janos
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Examines culture and cultural studies on an international scale, considering how institutions, practices, and (international) organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to create and affirm identities as well as to negotiate attempts to govern them.

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (11372)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: MW 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Fine Arts 102
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--such as ethnic, religious, political, and gender--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will analyze the processes through which certain identities are affirmed at the cost of alternative ones, paying careful attention to how and why people participate in acts of violence and discrimination against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and historical legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, cultural studies, and political theory. Students will acquire some familiarity with critical concepts such as colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and the state, race and ethnicity, and globalization and neoliberalism."

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (14617)

Instructor: Feinstein, Lee Andrew
Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1122
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

In a time of head-spinning global change, this course will help you make sense of the global system: How it works in theory, and how it works in practice. Why and under what circumstances have conflict and war emerged in international politics? When has diplomacy, cooperation, and peace prevailed? What explains the global decline of democracy and human rights? Does arms control still matter? What is the role of nuclear weapons? Through readings, lecture, discussion, and case studies, this course explores these questions by investigating the theory and history of diplomacy, security, and governance since 1945; how the international system is organized now; and what can be done to improve it.

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (33444)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1134
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

We hear that we live in an "increasingly globalized world," but what does that mean? This course analyzes the scope of global interdependencies today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities. Topics include the rhetoric of human rights, national and regional politics, and our perception of the "other." Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- personally and professionally.

INTL-L 250 INTRO TO INTL LAW&LEGAL INST (13092)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

For centuries, leaders, ethicists, lawyers, and philosophers have advocated and sought to design a system of law that can regulate relations between the world's different sovereign states. Law beyond the state, it has been argued, can control or at least mitigate the 'anarchy' of international relations and help states and other actors resolve many of the problems that plague international cooperation. This international law project has always faced significant obstacles. States do not relinquish sovereignty easily, and important critiques of international law have emerged, including from some observers who see it as little more than a mechanism for control by powerful states. But international law remains both a powerful aspiration and, in many areas, an important reality. The last several decades, in particular, have featured a remarkable expansion in the scope and ambition of international legal instruments. Understanding and being able to analyze legal instruments has therefore become essential in many areas of international relations. Accordingly, this introductory course will help students become familiar with international law's central instruments and methodological tools. Students will read excerpts from key international law cases, review and analyze elements of major treaties, and complete writing assignments designed to familiarize students with legal methods and analysis.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (10476)

Instructor: Zirogiannis, Nikolaos
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: INTERNATIONAL ENERGY MARKETS: ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC and HEALTH ASPECTS. Does electricity generation result in asthma attacks? Do urban or rural areas have a greater energy footprint? What role do carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems play in the energy markets around the world? Has renewable energy gained enough traction relative to fossil fuels? Are electric vehicles the best way to ease our dependence on oil? This class will explore the environmental, economic and health aspects of international energy markets. We will focus on the energy sectors (electricity and transportation) of key industrialized economies (US, EU, China) as well as those of developing nations and examine their impacts on the global (climate change) and local (air quality) environment. Our discussion will also center on policies and incentives that can alleviate the negative impacts of energy generation and consumption.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (11971)

Instructor: Spechler, Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 4
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY. Why did the United States get involved in Vietnam, and why did it stay in the war long after U.S. leaders knew we could not win? Why did the Soviets invade Afghanistan when they well knew that others' attempts to conquer that country had repeatedly failed? Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union despite the fact that no outside power since the 15th century had succeeded in subduing Russia? History and contemporary international relations are replete with examples of the risks, costs and difficulties of attacking and invading other states and intervening militarily in the politics and conflicts of others. This course will explore the question of why nations go to war when survival is not at stake. There will be many case studies, including some quite recent cases, but the focus will be on theories that help us understand this puzzling behavior on the part of states and those who determine or influence national policy. We will be examining the impact of individual leaders, their personal characteristics, beliefs, perceptions and misperceptions, as well as decision-making groups, government bureaucracies, national values and belief systems, and the nature and functioning of various kinds of political systems. A role-playing exercise at the end of the semester will give students an opportunity to simulate national decision-makers confronting the question of whether or not to use force.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (12744)

Instructor: Zirogiannis, Nikolaos
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: INTERNATIONAL ENERGY MARKETS: ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC and HEALTH ASPECTS. Does electricity generation result in asthma attacks? Do urban or rural areas have a greater energy footprint? What role do carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems play in the energy markets around the world? Has renewable energy gained enough traction relative to fossil fuels? Are electric vehicles the best way to ease our dependence on oil? This class will explore the environmental, economic and health aspects of international energy markets. We will focus on the energy sectors (electricity and transportation) of key industrialized economies (US, EU, China) as well as those of developing nations and examine their impacts on the global (climate change) and local (air quality) environment. Our discussion will also center on policies and incentives that can alleviate the negative impacts of energy generation and consumption.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (13082)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter Janos
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1122
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: WAR, GENOCIDE, AND LITERATURE. The course "War, Genocide, and Literature" is focused on artistic expressions that deal with the darkest moments of the last century. Experiences so painful that the individuals who endured them often would like to forget carry within them the moral imperative that they need to be remembered. How should war and genocide be portrayed and remembered? What is the proper way to hand down the collective memory of trauma to future generations? Some of these events still have living witnesses, some do not and this makes the case for the role and responsibility of a cultural memory that much more important. The course takes on one of the most important issues when it comes to remembering and forgetting and attempts to explore it in a multi-dimensional approach.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (33978)

Instructor: Lindberg, Tod
Day & Time: W 8:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: ETHICS AND DECISION-MAKING IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. This course explores the role of ethics and moral considerations in how and why states and politicians act internationally. Although some portray international politics as a realm of clashing national interest bereft of moral consideration, at the level of the individual, political leaders from antiquity to the present have sought to justify their actions in moral terms. This class explores normative reasoning--what should I do?--in all its aspects as applied to questions of international politics, including: whether to go to war and how to fight; what if any obligations the developed world owes to the developing world; whether and how to promote human rights and democratic government; moral justifications for authoritarian government; and national borders and who can cross them. Readings range from classics including Thucydides, Machiavelli, and Kant to modern works by Michael Walzer and Kwame Anthony Appiah.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (34147)

Instructor: De Groot, Michael Benjamin
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: RUSSIAN FOREIGN RELATIONS AND EASTERN EUROPE. Why did Russia annex Crimea in March 2014? Why does Moscow continue to support pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine? What can the Ukrainian crisis tell us about Russia?s relationship with Eastern Europe more broadly? This course will examine Russian foreign relations in Eastern Europe since the Second World War, exploring topics such as the rise and fall of the Soviet bloc, economic interdependence, and the security challenges of the post-Cold War order. Lectures, readings, and discussions will also consider how Russian relations with other parts of the world, particularly the West, affected Moscow?s behavior in the region during the Cold War and after.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (34425)

Instructor: Borhi, Laszlo
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-10-21 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: CONTEMPORARY EAST CENTRAL EUROPE. The history of East Central Europe in the 20th century is a tumultuous history of wars, hatreds, heroism, depredation, robbery, civilizational decline, mass murder, ideologies of salvation, totalitarian dictatorships and democratic experiments, foreign occupation, sieges, development and decline, success and failure. The course will discuss the place of East Central Europe in international politics, the bitter legacy of the 20th century that left its shadow indelibly on the region. We shall also discuss how this legacy affected the post 1989 transitions into pluralism and democracy.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (13987)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: GLOBAL HEALING. We study traditions, trajectories and technologies of healing in a globalized world. We focus on healing practices that have been traversing the world, some since ancient times, some on the cutting edge of scientific knowledge, bringing their own cultural histories along even as they are transformed by new practitioners, inventions and problems. We discuss the social, political and economic conditions that must be in place for healing practices to thrive; on the social interactional spaces and frameworks of interpretation that different healing practices create; on the interconnections formed among healers, those seeking treatment, and those implicated in causing dis-ease. Who and what is excluded or included within the spaces of different healing practices? How is power distributed among actors, places and historical periods? What identities, stories, and pathways of social change come together through healing practices and how might the curious conjunctures that emerge influence the shape of future worlds? Student evaluation is based on independent writing assignments and on class participation. Students also have an opportunity to pursue and present their individual interests, thereby expanding the range of healing practices under discussion and interacting with fellow students by designing and presenting visual image projects. Three books, written by ethnographers who write creatively about their participant observation fieldwork on healing in Central America (Panama), Europe (the Netherlands) and Oceania (Australia) will provide us with ideas and materials to think critically through our questions and concerns. We begin with anthropologist Kane's Phantom Gringo Boat, which takes an experimental approach to the classic anthropological subject of shamanism, showing how it is both an indigenous practice for healing spiritual dis-ease and a language for stretching the imagination toward the unknown forces propelling untoward changes in the Darién rainforest. In the second part, we will read political theorist Mol's The Body Multiple, which takes us into the nooks and crannies of a modern Dutch hospital. She shows how the interactions of doctors, patients and technologies, their many images and measurements, diagnoses, treatments, talk and manipulation work together to create a coherent object that is recognized as atherosclerosis. In the third part, we read Margaret Somerville's Water in a Dry Land, which intertwines aboriginal art and story telling to heal relationships between people and places. Together, the three books will guide our critical thinking about global healing practices as embodied, spiritual, political and technological.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (14439)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: T 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 18
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: FOOD, PLACE, AND WAR. What is the relationship between war, food and a distinctive sense of place? Uses literary nonfiction, including memoirs and histories, to examine how war shapes what people eat, how they get food, and how they use it to connect to communities and the places they inhabit.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (10469)

Instructor: Hunt, Katherine Eugene LeBreton
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1134
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: WOMEN, GENDER, AND HUMAN RIGHTS MOVEMENTS. How do social movements fighting for human rights for women and LGBTQI individuals accomplish their goals? This course considers the way groups organizing around gender issues strategize and utilize the tools available to them in their attempts to effect political and social change. In particular, the ways in which these attempts intersect with the media - both traditional media and new media - is given attention. These topics will be examined on a global scale as we consider the specific challenges faced by movements given differences in political, social, and cultural circumstances.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (8569)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter Janos
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE. How have the production, distribution and consumption of cultural products changed in our digital age? The effects of the continuous advancement of digital technologies and the penetration of computerized systems into our everyday lives are hard to fully assess because we are not just observers but also participants. Our relationship with knowledge, our ability to build meaning through cultural practices, and our very identities are each changing and being challenged. This class will consider digital and visual culture, modes of cultural production, preservation of non-digital content, copyrights, and remixing and sharing. Collaborative learning projects, including creation of audio/video/web content, will allow for an active and creative engagement with the material.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (14742)

Instructor: Arjomand, Noah Amir
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: MEDIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST. This course will explore media representations of Middle Eastern societies, as well as the role of media in Middle Eastern countries with an emphasis on Iran, Turkey, Egypt, and the Levant. Beginning with foundational media theory, we will then consider the history of mass media in the region, including print, radio, and television. The course will go on to treat the roles of old, new and social media in political and cultural revolutions of recent decades, along with the complexities of globalized media production involving transnational collaboration and diaspora populations.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (10351)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: GENOCIDE IN WORLD HISTORY: FROM CONQUEST TO MASS MURDER. This class will adopt a comparative and historical approach to the study of genocide. Based on Raphael Lemkin's holistic understanding of what constitutes genocide, and departing from the strict definition of genocide in the UN 1948 Convention, we will investigate various forms of destruction--from mass murder to cultural destruction. We will focus on the idea of conquest and on its relationship with imperial state-building. This will allow us to study the various facets of both colonial and post-WWII genocides. Cases will include the French revolution, Australia's Aboriginals, the Native Americans, the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, Rwanda, Syria's Yazidis, and South Sudan.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (31409)

Instructor: Bauerle, Sarah Elizabeth
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1134
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: GLOBAL ECONOMIC GOVERNANCE. Today, many political pundits lament the imminent collapse of the "liberal international order," and point to declining support for international economic treaties and organizations as proof. What is the liberal international order anyway, how did it come to be, who benefits from it, why is it under attack, and what might it be replaced with? In this course, you will learn about the key governance structures that have organized the flow of goods and money across borders since 1945, how they work, why they generate controversy, and how global forces are challenging these structures today. Along the way, you will become conversant in the language of trade and finance (no prerequisites required!), learn how to think about cooperation problems like a game theorist, and use case studies to evaluate the normative implications of our current global economic governance system.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (31412)

Instructor: Zajac, Justyna
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1106
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: CONTEMPORARY SECURITY ISSUES IN EUROPE. The course examines current major military and non-military threats and challenges to European security, such as conflicts and tensions in East and Central Europe, the Balkans, the Mediterranean region, the crisis of democracy, nationalism, separatism, migration and the refugee problem, ensuring energy supplies, and climate change. The course explores the role of NATO, the European Union and other institutions in providing security in Europe. It examines European security in the context of the changing international order characterized by redistribution of power in global politics. The goal of the course is to help students gain the appreciation of the complexities of European security issues and enhance students' analytical skills and abilities to think critically about the place of Europe in world politics.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (33785)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: THE LAW AND POLITICS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT. The creation of the International Criminal Court in 1998 was potentially one of the most significant developments in the history of international law. For the first time, a permanent court was created to investigate and prosecute individuals for some of the most serious violations of international law. The ICC began operating in July 2002 facing significant obstacles, however, including a lack of enforcement power, the opposition of the United States, and the absence of many other large and powerful states. This course explores the court's legal foundation and powers but also the difficult political context in which it operates.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (6925)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1134
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

I-315 provides a foundation for understanding and conducting research in international studies. Conducting research in the social sciences means identifying a research question, proposing a theory that answers it, developing a research design that fits the research question, gathering and analyzing data, and interpreting these findings. You will learn how to do each of these tasks, exploring different approaches to each, and learning how to navigate theoretical, methodological, and ethical questions that may arise. We will explore both quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating a research question. In particular, you will become familiar with methodologies such as case study, surveys, field experiments, ethnography, and in depth interviews. At its core, this course is about developing the tools for conducting and evaluating the process of knowledge accumulation about social, political, economic, and cultural processes. In order to give substantive weight to the research design questions explored in this class, we will read works on the theme of democratic erosion. We will evaluate scholarly works addressing the question of how and when democracies deteriorate, using the tools we develop throughout the course.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (10473)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

I-315 provides a foundation for understanding and conducting research in international studies. Conducting research in the social sciences means identifying a research question, proposing a theory that answers it, developing a research design that fits the research question, gathering and analyzing data, and interpreting these findings. You will learn how to do each of these tasks, exploring different approaches to each, and learning how to navigate theoretical, methodological, and ethical questions that may arise. We will explore both quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating a research question. In particular, you will become familiar with methodologies such as case study, surveys, field experiments, ethnography, and in depth interviews. At its core, this course is about developing the tools for conducting and evaluating the process of knowledge accumulation about social, political, economic, and cultural processes. In order to give substantive weight to the research design questions explored in this class, we will read works on the theme of democratic erosion. We will evaluate scholarly works addressing the question of how and when democracies deteriorate, using the tools we develop throughout the course.

INTL-I 325 INTL ISSUES THRU FOREIGN LANG (33792)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM - 6:35 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 7
Credit Hours: 1
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: GLOBAL HEALING ISSUES IN SPANISH. Students will discuss – in Spanish – the traditions, trajectories, and technologies of healing in a globalized world.

INTL-L 350 ORIGINS&EVOLUTION OF INTL LAW (33446)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

This course considers the intellectual and conceptual underpinnings and development of international law, with an emphasis on questions such as natural law, sovereignty, nationalism, and human rights.

INTL-L 354 IMMIGRATION LAW AND POLICY (33986)

Instructor: Krishnan, Jayanth Kumar
Day & Time: R 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1118
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

This course will focus on immigration law from, respectively, a legal, political, international, public policy, social, and ultimately, moral and ethical perspective. We will address issues such as citizenship, migration, marriage, asylum, and many more areas that relate to immigration law. To begin, in light of the current debate on immigration, we will explore how this discussion relates to issues such as class, inequalities, employment opportunities, and the history of who has been able to migrate to the U.S. and during what time periods -- and who has not. We also will study the implications of the rhetoric that has been used by the various sides during the course of this debate and, in particular, how civil society has responded. Additionally, we will analyze how international law, international treaties, and international institutions have contributed to both the public discourse and to public policy as it relates to immigration. And thereafter, we will look at the empirical research and data on what is actually occurring in terms of immigration trends within and into the U.S. At the end of the semester, my hope is that we will each have a more detailed understanding of the complex nature surrounding immigration policy in the United States.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (10470)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: 2:21 AM - 2:21 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (4039)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: M 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (5538)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 2
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (14369)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 401 GLOBAL SERVICE CAPSTONE (11396)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: 2:21 AM - 2:21 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Project or two workshops that captures the student's accumulated knowledge of global service.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (5825)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: M 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (9640)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 2
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (14370)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (13696)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 7
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: VIOLENCE AGAINST CIVILIANS IN WAR: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES. Why do armed groups engage in violence against civilians? What are the consequences for such conduct? Can such violence be limited in future conflicts? This course seeks to provide a framework for thinking about violence against civilians in war. We will approach these issues from theoretical, ethical, legal, empirical, and policy perspectives, examining the main moral and legal arguments prohibiting the targeting of civilians as well as theories used to understand variation in such armed group conduct. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply this knowledge in order to assess global policies to promote human security. Students pursuing careers in human rights, security, diplomacy, law, or international policy will find this course useful.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (33974)

Instructor: Lindberg, Tod
Day & Time: W 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1084
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: AFTER ATROCITIES. This is a class about political violence of the worst sort: killing on a scale that "shocks the conscience of mankind," what happens in the aftermath of genocide and mass atrocities, and what can be done to prevent such scarring episodes. We will undertake a brief survey of atrocities from classical times to the arrival of European settlers in the "New World." Our investigation will continue with examination in greater detail of the mass atrocities of the 20th Century, from the Armenian genocide through the Holocaust and Cambodia's "Killing Fields," to Rwanda, former Yugoslavia, and Darfur, on to today's headlines from Syria. We will examine efforts to hold perpetrators to account from Nuremberg to the Genocide Convention to the International Criminal Court, as well as other means of promoting healing and reconciliation, including truth commissions and consideration of reparations. Finally, we will assess the new 21st-Century effort to prevent atrocities internationally, from the development of the principle of the "responsibility to protect" to the tragic aftermath of intervention in Libya and the consequences of inaction in Syria. The course will be multidisciplinary in character, drawing on history, law, ethics and political theory and media including journalism, literature, and film.

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (31411)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: WOMEN AND WAR. This course introduces students to the topic of women and war, spanning across different time periods and regions. It equips students to look critically at women's assigned roles and at gendered identities in peace and in wartime, from a solid historical and comparative perspective. By the end of this course, students will understand women's experiences in war, and look critically at concepts such as "motherhood", "combat" or "sexual violence". The course covers five main topics in the study of women and war: an introduction to the concepts of gender, militarization and images of women; women's place in the war economy and as victims (along with men) of sexual/gender-based violence war; women's agency and their multiple roles in armies and other armed groups; women as perpetrators of violence and extremism; and women, the making of gendered ethnic identities and of a national history in the aftermath of war.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (12436)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: GLOBAL GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. For centuries, mankind has struggled to find ways to organize international life and restrain the chaos and conflict that have so often plagued it. But the search for structures and mechanisms to govern the world has always encountered forces that push in the other direction. The desire for uninhibited national sovereignty has been a consistent check on movements for international organization. Questions of democratic accountability remain a persistent problem for global governance efforts. As daunting have been architectural and mechanical problems. What mission should international organizations have? Who should control them and to whom are they responsible? Today, there exists a group of powerful but incomplete and often flawed global governance mechanisms. Formal organization including the World Bank, the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, and the International Criminal Court receive the most attention. At the regional level, the European Union, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and other organizations have become. Other efforts at providing governance across borders take less institutionalized forms, including networks, consultative groups, and even shared norms. Understanding the complex interactions between these mechanisms, national governments and other actors is essential to understanding the modern world.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (13090)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: W 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 6
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE GOVERNANCE: IU DELEGATION TO THE UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE. In this course, students will learn about climate issues, the Paris Agreement, and travel to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 25th Conference of Parties.

INTL-I 427 ISS IN GLBL DEV & POL ECONOMY (31410)

Instructor: Bauerle, Sarah Elizabeth
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: HARNESSING FOREIGN INVESTMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT. Corporations that operate across national boundaries powerfully structure the nature of production, consumption, and the distribution of wealth globally. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) can help bring economic growth and shared prosperity to developing countries, but critics often emphasize the negative consequences large global firms can have on local communities. How can states, international development organizations, and transnational social justice networks harness the positive potential of MNEs while minimizing their potential for exploitation? This course will offer students the empirical knowledge and analytical skills necessary to make sense of the influence of MNEs at both the local and global level, and the attempts to regulate their behavior. Topics include: How can firms manage the political risks associated with investing across borders?; How can governments attract "beneficial" foreign investment?; and How can civil society effectively pressure MNEs to adhere to higher labor and environmental standards? Throughout the course, students will learn about careers paths associated with MNEs and development, including political risk consulting, investment promotion and locational consulting, and non-profit work to develop and implement ethical labeling and sourcing standards.

INTL-I 431 NUMERIC LIT FOR GLOBAL CITIZEN (33973)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera Emily Eris
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 119
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

In this course students will learn how to analyze data and interpret results. Commonly used descriptive and inferential statistics will be covered, including measures of centrality and variation, hypothesis testing, and ordinary least squares regression. In the lab, students will learn how to use Stata, a statistical software, to explore and analyze data. The approach will emphasize matching quantitative analyses appropriately to research and policy questions. Class examples and activities will also introduce students to widely used international measures, such as the infant mortality rate, human development index, and gross domestic product. No previous coursework in statistics is required.

INTL-I 499 SEMINAR IN CONFLICT STUDIES (33788)

Instructor: Minton, Mark Clements
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 2
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: DIPLOMACY AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION. This course, taught by a former career Foreign Service Officer and U.S. Ambassador, will be limited to 20 students and conducted in interactive seminar form. Basic readings comprise several memoirs and/or histories of diplomatic negotiations conducted in recent years by U.S. diplomats, including Henry Kissinger, Richard Holbrooke, and Christopher Hill, as well as the instructor. Students will read these as case studies, then present their views to the entire class, engage in discussion with the instructor, and assess the material with fellow students. The course will feature a practical exercise in which students will work as several teams simulating a diplomatic negotiation on their own to resolve a conflict introduced to the class by the instructor. The objective is to provide students both with background on significant recent conflicts handled by diplomacy and a sense of what diplomats actually do.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10484)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM - 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Fine Arts 10
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10485)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Auditorium A152
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10486)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1118
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10487)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM - 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 220
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10488)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10578)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10579)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM - 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11142)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11143)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 1106
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (11713)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1220
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (11714)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 231
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (11715)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 125
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12051)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 119
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12052)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 119
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12053)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM - 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 119
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12054)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 11
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12055)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 11
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12056)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM - 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 11
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (31393)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM - 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (31414)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1204
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (31418)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 144
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 431 NUMERIC LIT FOR GLOBAL CITIZEN (33970)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: SPEA 151
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 431 NUMERIC LIT FOR GLOBAL CITIZEN (34000)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 221
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20