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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (12437)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: GLOBAL GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. For centuries, mankind has struggled to find ways to organize international life and restrain the chaos and conflict that have so often plagued it. But the search for structures and mechanisms to govern the world has always encountered forces that push in the other direction. The desire for uninhibited national sovereignty has been a consistent check on movements for international organization. Questions of democratic accountability remain a persistent problem for global governance efforts. As daunting have been architectural and mechanical problems. What mission should international organizations have? Who should control them and to whom are they responsible? Today, there exists a group of powerful but incomplete and often flawed global governance mechanisms. Formal organization including the World Bank, the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, and the International Criminal Court receive the most attention. At the regional level, the European Union, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and other organizations have become. Other efforts at providing governance across borders take less institutionalized forms, including networks, consultative groups, and even shared norms. Understanding the complex interactions between these mechanisms, national governments and other actors is essential to understanding the modern world.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (13086)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera Emily Eris
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 119
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: NUMERIC LITERACY FOR GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP. In this course students will learn how to analyze data and interpret results. Commonly used descriptive and inferential statistics will be covered, including measures of centrality and variation, hypothesis testing, and ordinary least squares regression. In the lab, students will learn how to use Stata, a statistical software, to explore and analyze data. The approach will emphasize matching quantitative analyses appropriately to research and policy questions. Class examples and activities will also introduce students to widely used international measures, such as the infant mortality rate, human development index, and gross domestic product. No previous coursework in statistics is required.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (13091)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: W 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 6
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE GOVERNANCE: IU DELEGATION TO THE UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE. In this course, students will learn about climate issues, the Paris Agreement, and travel to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 25th Conference of Parties.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (13891)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: SPEA 151
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (13892)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morgan) 221
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (31408)

Instructor: Friedman, Sara Lizbeth
Day & Time: W 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: LAW AND CULTURE. This course is a graduate-level introduction to legal anthropology. At the intersection of legal studies and anthropology, this sub-discipline examines the role of law in, of, and through culture and society. Key questions include: How are legal systems shaped by culture? How are cultures shaped by legal systems? Are all legal-cultural systems equal? We will read widely from both classic and contemporary texts in the fields of legal and political anthropology, examining the logics of legal systems and how people use, abuse, subvert and leverage them. Focusing broadly on how law matters in everyday lives, we will address law?s changing relationship to discipline, power, justice, and governmentality. Topics to be covered include domestic violence, human rights, access to justice, legal pluralism and the ?rule of law,? bureaucracy and governing, and citizenship and sovereignty.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (33794)

Instructor: Pitts Jr, Montie Bryan
Day & Time: W 5:45 PM - 8:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 142
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN GRADUATE STUDIES.This seminar has two interrelated goals: First, it will introduce you to the history of Latin American and Caribbean Studies as an intellectual project, with a focus on how "Latin America and the Caribbean" came to exist as an object of analysis, as well as the relationship of Latin American and Caribbean Studies to larger political projects. Second, it will familiarize you with the methodologies of some of the disciplines that are important to Latin American and Caribbean Studies, including literature, history, anthropology, and political science. While you won?t become an expert in any of these methodologies, the idea is to familiarize you with them so that you can evaluate scholarship produced in these disciplines. In addition, the course will help you refine skills that you need to conduct graduate level research, including using library resources and university archives, developing a research project, surveying the relevant scholarly production on your topics, writing a grant proposal, and navigating the IRB process for research with human subjects.

INTL-I 504 SEM IN HUMAN RGHTS & INTL LAW (33975)

Instructor: Lindberg, Tod
Day & Time: W 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1084
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: AFTER ATROCITIES. This is a class about political violence of the worst sort: killing on a scale that "shocks the conscience of mankind," what happens in the aftermath of genocide and mass atrocities, and what can be done to prevent such scarring episodes. We will undertake a brief survey of atrocities from classical times to the arrival of European settlers in the "New World." Our investigation will continue with examination in greater detail of the mass atrocities of the 20th Century, from the Armenian genocide through the Holocaust and Cambodia?s "Killing Fields," to Rwanda, former Yugoslavia, and Darfur, on to today?s headlines from Syria. We will examine efforts to hold perpetrators to account from Nuremberg to the Genocide Convention to the International Criminal Court, as well as other means of promoting healing and reconciliation, including truth commissions and consideration of reparations. Finally, we will assess the new 21st-Century effort to prevent atrocities internationally, from the development of the principle of the "responsibility to protect" to the tragic aftermath of intervention in Libya and the consequences of inaction in Syria. The course will be multidisciplinary in character, drawing on history, law, ethics and political theory and media including journalism, literature, and film.

INTL-I 506 SEMINAR IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (31386)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morgan) 5
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 506 SEMINAR IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (31388)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 13
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: WOMEN AND WAR. This course introduces students to the topic of women and war, spanning across different time periods and regions. It equips students to look critically at women's assigned roles and at gendered identities in peace and in wartime, from a solid historical and comparative perspective. By the end of this course, students will understand women's experiences in war, and look critically at concepts such as "motherhood", "combat" or "sexual violence". The course covers five main topics in the study of women and war: an introduction to the concepts of gender, militarization and images of women; women's place in the war economy and as victims (along with men) of sexual/gender-based violence war; women's agency and their multiple roles in armies and other armed groups; women as perpetrators of violence and extremism; and women, the making of gendered ethnic identities and of a national history in the aftermath of war.

INTL-I 510 SEM DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERN (31390)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 7
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: VIOLENCE AGAINST CIVILIANS IN WAR: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES. Why do armed groups engage in violence against civilians? What are the consequences for such conduct? Can such violence be limited in future conflicts? This course seeks to provide a framework for thinking about violence against civilians in war. We will approach these issues from theoretical, ethical, legal, empirical, and policy perspectives, examining the main moral and legal arguments prohibiting the targeting of civilians as well as theories used to understand variation in such armed group conduct. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply this knowledge in order to assess global policies to promote human security. Students pursuing careers in human rights, security, diplomacy, law, or international policy will find this course useful.

INTL-I 510 SEM DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERN (33787)

Instructor: Minton, Mark Clements
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 2
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

Topic: DIPLOMACY AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION. This course, taught by a former career Foreign Service Officer and U.S. Ambassador, will be limited to 20 students and conducted in interactive seminar form. Basic readings comprise several memoirs and/or histories of diplomatic negotiations conducted in recent years by U.S. diplomats, including Henry Kissinger, Richard Holbrooke, and Christopher Hill, as well as the instructor. Students will read these as case studies, then present their views to the entire class, engage in discussion with the instructor, and assess the material with fellow students. The course will feature a practical exercise in which students will work as several teams simulating a diplomatic negotiation on their own to resolve a conflict introduced to the class by the instructor. The objective is to provide students both with background on significant recent conflicts handled by diplomacy and a sense of what diplomats actually do.

INTL-I 515 RESEARCH METHODS INTL STUDIES (10474)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & Intl Studies Bldg 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

I-515 provides a foundation for understanding and conducting research in international studies. Conducting research in the social sciences means identifying a research question, proposing a theory that answers it, developing a research design that fits the research question, gathering and analyzing data, and interpreting these findings. You will learn how to do each of these tasks, exploring different approaches to each, and learning how to navigate theoretical, methodological, and ethical questions that may arise. We will explore both quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating a research question. In particular, you will become familiar with methodologies such as case study, surveys, field experiments, ethnography, and in depth interviews. At its core, this course is about developing the tools for conducting and evaluating the process of knowledge accumulation about social, political, economic, and cultural processes. In order to give substantive weight to the research design questions explored in this class, we will read works on the theme of democratic erosion. We will evaluate scholarly works addressing the question of how and when democracies deteriorate, using the tools we develop throughout the course.

INTL-I 680 INTL STUDIES MASTER'S CAPSTONE (12821)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: 7:03 AM - 7:03 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

INTL-I 701 INTERDISC SEM - GLOBAL STUDIES (11443)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen Joseph
Day & Time: M 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 2280
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20

This graduate seminar is designed to stimulate students to think critically about a broad range of theoretical and methodological issues involved in global research, including ethics, qualitative and quantitative approaches, the intersection of the global and local, and research designs from different disciplinary perspectives.

INTL-I 702 IND STUDY IN GLOBAL STUDIES (8575)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: 7:03 AM - 7:03 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-08-26 End Date: 2019-12-20