Indiana University Bloomington
Choose which site to search

Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

Buddhism in Central Asia

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

The Buddha, who flourished around 500 BC, is believed to have achieved enlightenment in eastern India. But the earliest evidence for Early Buddhism, and for the Normative Buddhism that developed in the first or second century AD, comes from Gandhara, a country in the southeastern corner of Central Asia (now in Afghanistan) and northwestern corner of India (now in Pakistan). Scholars of Buddhism have written much on legendary ¿early¿ Buddhism, but what was the earliest known Buddhism really like? What do the early accounts say the Buddha actually taught?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/christopher-i-beckwith
Course Code: 
R529
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Frontier China: Migrants, Nomads, and Borderland Nobodies

Regions Covered: 
China
Mongolia
Tibet
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

There is a rich China, a beautiful China. And there is a China that is anything but: poor, marginal, and hardscrabble. In our minds, a Great Wall separates the two. High civilization, productivity, and the state lie on one side, crude lawlessness lies on the other. Yet, throughout Chinese history, ordinary people straddled the line between heartland and frontier: settlers, immigrants, merchants, missionaries, runaways, and nomads. What, then, did the Great Wall represent? What dynamics defined the historical relations between settled and mobile communities in China?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/jonathan-schlesinger
Course Code: 
G200
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Oil, Islam, and Geopolitics

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
China
Iran
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

Introduction to the politics of modern Central Asia, including Afghanistan and Pakistan, with reference to the timely themes of energy politics, global Islam, and geopolitics.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gardner-bovingdon-0
Course Code: 
R192
When Taught: 
Fall 2012

The Eastern Turkestan Republic (1944-1949) Through the Eyes of Western Diplomats

Date: 
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm

The Central Eurasian Studies Colloquium 2012-2013 presents Dr. Ablet Kamalov, Chief Research Fellow, R.B. Suleimenov Institute of Oriental Studies, Almaty, Kazakhstan

Learning, Connecting, Recruiting: Building on over sixty years of IU’s Summer Language Workshop (SWSEEL)

Each summer, for the past sixty-three years, students from all over the world converge in Bloomington to study over twenty less commonly taught languages offered at the Summer Language Workshop (SWSEEL). Founded in 1950, SWSEEL is one of the oldest and largest programs of its kind in North America and has grown to include Central Eurasian languages such as Dari, Kazakh, Mongolian, Hungarian, Pashto, Tatar, Uyghur, and Uzbek. This year, for the first time, Turkish and Persian were also offered.

Thirteenth Annual CESS Conference

Date: 
Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 12:00pm to Sunday, October 21, 2012 - 12:00pm

The Thirteenth Annual Conference of the Central Eurasian Studies Society (CESS) will be held at Indiana University, hosted by the Sinor Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies and the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center. The program will feature panel and paper topics relating to all aspects of humanities and social science scholarship on Central Eurasia, a geographic domain which extends from the Black Sea and Iranian Plateau to Mongolia and Siberia, including the Caucasus, Crimea, Middle Volga, Afghanistan, Tibet, Xinjiang, and Central and Inner Asia.

Making Minzu Heritage in Xinjiang

Date: 
Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm

Elise Anderson, a PhD student in Central Eurasian Studies and Folklore and Ethnomusicology, will be giving a CEUS Colloquium lecture this Wednesday, March 07, entitled "Making Minzu Heritage in Xinjiang." All those interested are invited to attend the talk in the IMU's Walnut Room at 4 PM. 

Urumchi's Hot July

Descriptive Text: 
The following is a lecture by Dr. Gardner Bovingdon, an assistant professor in the Central Eurasian Studies Department at Indiana University, Bloomington. The lecture, entitled “Urumchi’s Hot July,” was presented on November 4th, 2009, and was the third lecture in the 2009-2010 Central Eurasian Studies Colloquium. The lecture was sponsored by the Sinor Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, the Central Eurasian Studies Department, and the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center.

Xinjiang

Although historically distinct from China, the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (Xinjiang), also known as Eastern Turkestan, comprises approximately one-sixth of the land area of the People's Republic of China. The region was conquered under the Manchu Qing dynasty, who named the region "New Frontier," or Xinjiang. After a brief period of independence after the fall of the Qing, the region was reincorporated into the People's Republic of China.

Pages

Subscribe to Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region