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Submission Deadline of Twenty First Annual Association of Central Eurasian Students Conference

Date: 
Monday, October 21, 2013 - 4:53pm

TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL EURASIAN STUDENTS CONFERENCE INDIANA UNIVERSITY, BLOOMINGTON

Submission Deadline: December 1st, 2013

The Association of Central Eurasian Students (ACES) at Indiana University invites panel and individual paper proposals for the Twentieth Annual Central Eurasian Studies Conference to be held Saturday, March 8th, 2013 on the Bloomington campus of Indiana University.

Kathryn Graber "'Real Buryat,' Offline and On: Voicing Authority in Southeastern Siberia"

Date: 
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 - 4:00pm

From generation to generation, residents of southeastern Siberia have been shifting from the once-dominant local language, Buryat, to Russian. As knowledge of Buryat seems to erode before them, people for whom this language has been a powerful identity marker mourn its loss and seek new means of revitalization, particularly in mass media. But what version of the language counts as the “real Buryat” to be reclaimed, and where—if anywhere—can this language be found? This talk examines the variety of forms that speakers profess to be real, authentic, genuine, or pure expressions of Buryat and shows how linguistic details from everyday life illuminate the remaking of the contemporary Buryat public. Drawing on long-term ethnographic and linguistic field research, I will focus on how speakers ascribe certain types of speech to certain domains of social action (sometimes to the exclusion of actual practices) and evoke these sites in order to negotiate authenticity, authority, and expertise. In particular, they routinely contrast a degraded colloquial or “kitchen” Buryat with the language of media institutions, according to a powerful language ideology that venerates a literary standard. New online media offer the possibility of democratizing this situation by expanding the language community, interconnecting the growing Buryat diaspora, and opening the floor to non-expert commentators. Yet at the same time, digital connectivity allows new ways of policing those commentators and delimiting what should count as ways of speaking—and being—“real Buryat.”

Sas Carey "Changes in Mongolia 1994-2013, with a Special Emphasis on Reindeer Herding Nomads"

Date: 
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 - 4:15pm

Horizons of Knowledge Lecture

In 20 years, Mongolia has changed from a place where the streets and stores in the capital were empty, to a mineral-rich country with a projected GDP of 11% for the next 10 years, bringing prosperity and consumer goods into the country.  Does their nomadic background help Mongolians deal with these vast changes? What is different in the life of the reindeer herder today? What has changed in rural health care? A power point of photos from then and now will be presented

Climate and the Rise of the 13th Century Mongol Empire

Descriptive Text: 

On October 4th, Neil Pederson, Lamont Assistant Research Professor at Tree Ring Laboratory of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Columbia University, gave a talk on historical climate change, and half of the lecture was on the role of climate change in the rise of the Mongol Empire.

Related Regions: 

Graduate Student Brown Bag Talks

Graduate Student Brown Bag Talks

Teresa Nichols "Making and Managing Mongolian Heritage" Brown Bag

Date: 
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 12:00pm

Please join us for the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center’s new Graduate Student Brown Bag Talks. All are invited to hear a presentation from graduate students that study the region, who will be discussing their research methods, recent work, and experiences.

The Secret History of the Mongols

The Secret History of the Mongols is Mongolian’s great classic and one of the greatest pieces of history ever written. In this seminar we will read it slowly, exploring it from historical, textual (philological), source-critical, literary, ideological, folkloric, linguistic, and many other points of view. Students will write a seminar paper which will be critiqued by the class in the last two weeks of class.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R760
When Taught: 
Spring 2012

Mongolian Literature and Folklore

This course carries COLL S & H distribution credit

The written and oral art of word, interaction of orality and writing. History of Mongol literary studies. Collections of monuments; internal and external sources. Broad and narrow concepts of literature. Periods and areas. Connections with other arts (music, drama, visual arts) and with the sacred.. Authorship and anonymity. Original and translated works. Indo-Tibetan, Chinese, Turkic and Western influences. Forms and functions. Prose and verse. Narrative and lyric genres. The Mongol verse.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R661

Mongolian Languages and Dialects

Introduction to Mongolian traditional civilization: elements of the material culture (dwelling, wear, food, transport, warfare, hunting, animal husbandry, crafts, agriculture, orientation, reckoning of time, etc.), social and spiritual life (kinship, wedding, family, birth, name, childhood, toys and games, races, medicine, death; folk religion, Buddhism and monastic lore, shamanism, beliefs and ideals, values and taboos, omens, divinatory practices), folk arts (music, oral literature, dance, etc.).

No knowledge of Mongolian is required.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R562

Shamanism and Folk Religion of the Mongols

In the last eight centuries the Mongols embraced several dogmatic religions: Buddhism, Christianity and Islam. From among these three world-religions Buddhism in its Tibetan form proved to be the dominant system for the majority of the Mongolian-speaking peoples. In spite of suppression and persecution, their primitive system of beliefs and practices called shamanism never ceased to exist, not even under the rule of the official atheist ideology of the near past, but in its struggle with Buddhism it has been transformed.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R564

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