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Historical Central Eurasia

Mongol Century

This course deals with the empire built by the Mongols in the 13th century—the largest land empire in the world. Most readings will be from translated primary sources of the 13th and 14th centuries, written by the Mongols themselves and also by Persians, Chinese, Eastern Christians, Europeans, and other peoples that fought, surrendered to, or traded with the Mongol conquerors.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R593
When Taught: 
Fall 2010

Property in Central Eurasia

Regions Covered: 
China
Hungary
Iran
Kazakhstan
Mongolia
Romania
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

A land of nomads and industrialists, communists and capitalists, media moguls and pirates all at the same time, Central Eurasia has been a testing ground-and battleground-for some of society’s greatest experiments in property: what can (or should) be owned, who can own it, and what they can do with it. This course explores the development of conceptions of property and property rights in Central Eurasia, from the establishment of rights over hunting and grazing grounds to fights over copyright and patents.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/kathryn-graber
Course Code: 
R599
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

The Naqshbandi Sufis in Central Asia

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Historical Central Eurasia

This course will survey the origins and historical development of the Naqshbandi Sufi order in Central Asia.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/devin-deweese
Course Code: 
R415
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Iran
Turkey
Historical Central Eurasia

This course carries Culture Studies & COLL S & H distribution credit

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/m-nazif-shahrani
Course Code: 
R552
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Buddhist Lives: The Buddha, Milarepa, and the Dalai Lama

Regions Covered: 
Tibet
Historical Central Eurasia

What can we learn from the lives of Siddhartha Gautama, Jetsun Milarepa, and Tenzin Gyatso, better known as the Buddha, Milarepa and the 14th Dalai Lama, respectively? By examining their deeds and beliefs, as well as canonical and non-canonical texts, the meaning of the dharma and Buddhism in general will be explored. No knowledge of Pali or Tibetan is necessary, just an interest in the religion and region.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gedun-rabsal
Course Code: 
R199
When Taught: 
Fall 2012
Fall 2013

Russia's Orient 1552-1924

Regions Covered: 
Tatarstan
Historical Central Eurasia

This course for graduate students examines the relationship between Russia (late Muscovite and imperial) and the Turkic peoples inhabiting the Volga-Ural region, the northern littoral of the Black Sea, the North and South Caucasus, as well as nomadic and sedentary Central and Inner Asia.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/edward-lazzerini-0
Course Code: 
R628
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Buddhism in Central Asia

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

The Buddha, who flourished around 500 BC, is believed to have achieved enlightenment in eastern India. But the earliest evidence for Early Buddhism, and for the Normative Buddhism that developed in the first or second century AD, comes from Gandhara, a country in the southeastern corner of Central Asia (now in Afghanistan) and northwestern corner of India (now in Pakistan). Scholars of Buddhism have written much on legendary ¿early¿ Buddhism, but what was the earliest known Buddhism really like? What do the early accounts say the Buddha actually taught?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/christopher-i-beckwith
Course Code: 
R529
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Frontier China: Migrants, Nomads, and Borderland Nobodies

Regions Covered: 
China
Mongolia
Tibet
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

There is a rich China, a beautiful China. And there is a China that is anything but: poor, marginal, and hardscrabble. In our minds, a Great Wall separates the two. High civilization, productivity, and the state lie on one side, crude lawlessness lies on the other. Yet, throughout Chinese history, ordinary people straddled the line between heartland and frontier: settlers, immigrants, merchants, missionaries, runaways, and nomads. What, then, did the Great Wall represent? What dynamics defined the historical relations between settled and mobile communities in China?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/jonathan-schlesinger
Course Code: 
G200
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Prophets, Poets, Kings: Iranian Civilization

Regions Covered: 
Iran
Historical Central Eurasia

This course traces the history of Iranians from ancient times through the Arab conquest to today. It focuses on institutions, religions, secular and ecclesiastic hierarchies, minorities, devotional and communal change, and Iranian influences on Islam. Visual and archeological aids will be used. No previous knowledge or course work required.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/jamsheed-choksy
Course Code: 
R551
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Oil, Islam, and Geopolitics

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
China
Iran
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

Introduction to the politics of modern Central Asia, including Afghanistan and Pakistan, with reference to the timely themes of energy politics, global Islam, and geopolitics.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gardner-bovingdon-0
Course Code: 
R192
When Taught: 
Fall 2012

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