Indiana University Bloomington
Choose which site to search

Historical Central Eurasia

Empire of the Mongols

This course is an introduction to the Mongols Empire of the 13th century—the largest land empire in the world. In the class, we will look at the Mongols’ unique steppe nomadic lifestyle, how it prepared them for military success, and then how Chinggis Khan (known in the West as Genghis) added rapid adaption to siege warfare and governmental institutions to that foundation.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R193
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

The Civilization of Tibet

This course carries Culture Studies & COLL S & H distribution credit

Regions Covered: 
Tibet
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R270
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Highlights from the 20th Annual Central Eurasian Studies Conference

Every year for the past two decades, the Central Eurasian Studies Conference has taken place on the Bloomington campus of Indiana University, hosted by the Association for Central Eurasian Students (ACES), a graduate student organization housed in IU’s Department of Central Eurasian Studies. Continuing in this tradition, the conference took place this year on April 6th and marked the 20th year of its inception.

20th Annual ACES Central Eurasian Studies Conference

Date: 
Saturday, April 6, 2013 - 9:00am to 6:00pm

New schedule posted for the 20th Annual Central Eurasian Studies Conference. Keynote address by Tsering Shakya, Canada Research Chair in Religion and Contemporary Society in Asia Institute of Asian Research University of British Columbia.

Works-in-Progress Workshop: “Early Modern Orientalism between Humanist Ideals and Political Pragmatism: Busbecq’s Ottoman Missions (1554-62)”

Date: 
Friday, March 1, 2013 - 12:00pm

As part of a Works-in-Progress Workshop, Professor Kaya Sahin will be discussing his paper titled “Early Modern Orientalism between Humanist Ideals and Political Pragmatism: Busbecq’s Ottoman Missions (1554-62)".

The Peculiar Lives of Texts in Translation: Common Challenges in Medieval Studies across Cultural and Disciplinary Boundaries

To engage directly with the challenges brought by the global scope of Medieval Studies, IU’s Medieval Studies Institute brought together scholars whose work spanned the Eurasian continent to discuss their common challenges as well as their common grounds for cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary collaboration.

Panelists included Asma Afsaruddin (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures), Christopher Atwood (Department of Central Eurasian Studies), Christopher Beckwith (Department of Central Eurasian Studies), Manling Luo (Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures), and John Walbridge (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures). The panel was moderated by Rosemary McGerr, Director of the Medieval Studies Institute and Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature.

Pages

Subscribe to Historical Central Eurasia