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EASC Newsletter

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A publication of the East Asian Studies Center, Indiana University

November 2009

Student Updates

Yu-Min (Claire) Chen (Ph.D., Comparative Literature) received an EASC travel grant to present “Cape No. 7: A Post-modern Film Narrative of National Identity within Cross-cultural Hybridity” at the 15th Annual North American Taiwan Studies Conference in Austin in June.

Xin Fan (Ph.D., History) received travel funds from EASC to present “From German Indologie to Chinese National Studies, Ji Xianlin in Contemporary Chinese Intellectual History” at the 33rd Annual Conference of the German Studies Association in Washington, D.C. in October.

Abraham Gerber (B.A., Political Science) received a State Department Critical Language Scholarship to study Chinese last spring and studied for eight weeks in Suzhou in Jiangsu province. While in China, he also had the opportunity to travel to Yunnan Province and a number of cities, including Nanjing, Hangzhou, Wuxi, and Shanghai. He says that his receiving this scholarship “was a result of my connection with the Chinese Language Flagship program” at IU.

Timothy Grose (Ph.D., Central Eurasian Studies) received a Boren Fellowship to research education programs established for minority children in China, specifically a boarding school program for China’s Uyghur minority. This research is in addition to a language component of the grant in which he will study Uyghur and Chinese. Grose will study in China from June to December 2010 and spend most of this time at the Minzu University of China in Beijing.

Shingo Hamada (Ph.D., Anthropology) received a travel grant from EASC to present “Gone with the Herring: Ainu Geographic Names and a Reinterpretation of Histories of Coastal Hokkaido” at the Japanese Studies Association Annual Conference in Honolulu in January.

Elizabeth Holcombe (M.A., EALC) moved to Washington, D.C. over the summer to start her training as a Foreign Service Officer. After a four-month training period, she expects to be stationed in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.

In August Greg Johnson (Ph.D., EALC) successfully defended his dissertation, “Mobilizing the ‘Junior Nation’: The Mass Evacuation of School Children in Wartime Japan,” and completed his degree. He is now an associate professor in the Faculty of Comparative Culture at Otsuma Women’s University in Tokyo.

Ock-Hwan Kim (Ph.D., Linguistics) received an EASC travel grant to present “Economy on Ellipsis Interpretation” at the 19th Japanese and Korean Linguistics Conference in Manoa in November.

Caleb Kramer earned his B.A. in Telecommunications from IU in August 2009 and is working as a junior trends consultant at MobileBehavior, a media, marketing, and advertising consultancy in New York City.

Erika Kuever (Ph.D., Anthropology) received a 2009-10 Fulbright IIE Scholarship to carry out dissertation research in Beijing on consumer protection and citizenship in China. She is currently based at Peking University and is researching public attitudes toward the quality of food and other consumer products. She hopes to extend her geographic area of research to areas outside Beijing in the near future.

Jihye Lee (Ph.D., Second Language Studies) received funding from EASC to present “Directives of Teachers and American Learners of Korean” at the American Association of Teachers of Korean in Seattle in June.

Yu-Hsiu (Hugo) Lee (Ph.D., Literacy, Culture, and Language Education) received travel funds from EASC to present “Conceptualizing Asian Languages in Diaspora with Biliteracy: Lessons Learned from Asian Heritage Language Maintenance in Taiwan” at the International Conference on Language, Society, and Culture in Asian Contexts in Thailand in January.

Haiyan Liu (Ph.D., Criminal Justice) received an EASC travel grant to present “Private Property Rights v. Maintaining Socialist Market Order: The Criminal Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in the U.S., Taiwan and Mainland China” at the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting in Philadelphia in November.

Adam Molon (B.A., EALC; B.S., Finance) received a State Department Critical Language Scholarship for the second time in 2009 for intensive study of Mandarin Chinese at Heilongjiang University in Harbin, China. Molon is a student in IU’s Chinese Language Flagship Program.

Jonathan Pettit (Ph.D., EALC and Religious Studies) received travel funds from EASC to present “Barbarian Hemp and the Propagation of Holy Plants in Medieval China” at the American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting in Montreal in November.

Tim Rich (Ph.D., Political Science) received travel funding from EASC to present “Status for Sale: Taiwan and the Competition for Diplomatic Recognition” at the annual meeting of the Midwest region of the International Studies Association in St. Louis, MO in November.

Jeremy Stoll (Ph.D., Folklore and Ethnomusicology) received travel funds from EASC to present “Voicing Dissent in the Naming of Nonhuman Animals” at the American Folklore Society Annual Meeting in Boise in October.

Nicole Willock (Ph.D., Central Eurasian Studies and Religious Studies) received travel funds from EASC to present “Deconstructing Aspects of the Secular and Religious in the Transmission of Buddhist Knowledge: A Glimpse into the Life of a Tibetan Buddhist Scholar in Modern China” at the American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting in Montreal in November.

Ya-Chu (Karen) Yang (Ph.D., Comparative Literature) received EASC funding to present “Relocating Taiwan Identity: Nationalism, Localism, and Globalization in Chen Huai-En’s Island Etude” at the 15th Annual North American Taiwan Studies Conference in Austin in June.

Ran Zhang (Ph.D., Educational Policy Studies and Educational Psychology) defended her dissertation on the resolution of student grievances in Chinese universities. She completed her degree and has accepted an appointment as an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Education at Peking University.

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