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Department of Anthropology College of Arts and Sciences
One Discipline, Four Fields

Graduate Courses

SPRING 2018


GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-A 595 Graduate Reading in Anthropology
Sept (13450)

ANTH-A 800 Research
Sept (1584)

ANTH-A 800 Research
Sept (4892)

ANTH-A 576 Graduate Museum Practicum
Jackson (13446)

ANTH-A 595 Graduate Reading in Anthropology
Jackson (13447)

ANTH-A 595 Graduate Reading in Anthropology
Jackson (13449)

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ARCHAEOLOGY

ANTH-P 502 Archaeological Research Design
King / Brondizio (30447)
10:10am-12:25pm M
SB 060

1. Students will prepare a competitive research proposal that can be submitted to an agency or foundation for doctoral dissertation research. To do so, students will compose multiple drafts of each of the relevant sections of a grant proposal for submission, review, and resubmission on a weekly basis.
2. Students will become familiar with major funding agencies, and their diverse ways of announcing funding opportunities, and the procedures and style of submission that are unique to some of the major ones.
3. Students will learn about problem-oriented research, how to frame a research question, selecting appropriate sampling strategies, how to create and manage data, and how to operationalize a research strategy. Student will understand how social scientists reconcile their traditional methods of site-specific research with the demands placed upon them by agendas that expect research to have broader significance. Using student proposals as examples, the course reviews the methodologies used by anthropologists, including especially social-cultural anthropologists and archaeologists.
4. Students will understand how review panels are constituted, how the review process works, and how to engage in the process of revise and resubmit in order to be responsive to reviewers and address limitations of submitted proposals and constantly improve them.
5. Students will become familiar with IU administrative offices and resources related to grant preparation and grant management, and will understand the process of human subject’s approval and proposal management.

ANTH-P 646 N American Prehistoric Through Fiction
Scheiber (30482)
10:10am-12:25pm TR
SB 050

In this course, we will read several fictionalized accounts of life in Ancient North America, written by anthropologists and novelists, as a means to think critically and creatively about the past. We will use these novels to consider what we think we know about this topic from archaeological and paleo environmental evidence and from ethno archaeological and anthropological research and to discuss the language of archaeological writing. We will explore the role and place of narrative and imagination in the constructions of the past and how these authors utilize available data. We will consider the success of the authors in expanding, challenging, and constraining our understandings. Most of the novels will be set in the past, from the first inhabitants of this continent 11,000 years ago to their descendants who met European invaders in the sixteenth century, and another novel will discuss the past by presenting contemporary archaeologists as the lead characters. The grade will primarily be based on participation, discussion, and a final take-home exam. Graduate students enrolled in the course are also expected to write a short research paper and creative essay. The first class of the week will generally be devoted to discussions of the novels, and on the second class we will discuss the archaeological evidence behind the stories.

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BIOANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-B 524 Theory & Meth Human Paleontology
Hunt (33841)
9:30am-10:45am TR
BH 144

ANTH-B 544 Biology and Culture of Women's Bodies
Vitzthum (30298)
1:00pm-3:15pm R
MO 107

ANTH-B 600 Seminar in Bio Anthropology; Evolution of Human Ecological Footprint
Wasserman (30296)
4:30pm-6:45pm W
OP 105

The current environmental crisis did not begin overnight and likely has roots deep in our evolutionary history. Although the scale of our effects on the biosphere has only recently shown exponential growth, it is worth examining how we got to this point today. This course explores a series of threshold moments in the history of our species that had great implications for the environment.

ANTH-B 600 Seminar in Bio Anthropology; Primate Behavior: Legacy Jane Goodall
Hunt (30298)
11:30am-1:45pm W
SB 332

Seldom in science has one individual had such an impact on a field of study as Jane Goodall has had on primatology?  Most of our early knowledge of chimpanzee behavior and ecology we learned directly from her publications and much of what we have learned since we know from the work of researchers who had their start at Gombe or from work growing out of analysis of the immense Gombe dataset.  In this seminar through discussion, films and occasional lectures we will investigate the structure of chimpanzee society and ecology.  Seminar reading will begin with the three works that constituted much of what we knew of chimpanzees before Goodall, the first study of wild chimpanzees by Henry Nissen (1931), Wolfgang Köhler’s The Mentality of Apes (1925) and Nadia Koht’s Comparative Study of Ape Emotions (1935).  We will read Goodall’s early scientific publications and her classic popular book In the Shadow of Man as an introduction to current understanding of chimpanzee behavior.  The rest of the seminar will devoted to reading recent scientific literature that builds on this foundation.  Among the issues we will cover are feeding behavior, sexual behavior, communication, language studies, association patterns, social bonding, mother-infant interactions, reproduction, and patterns of aggression, dominance relationships and ranging behavior.  A term paper will be required.  Grades will be assigned based on attendance/participation (30%), a Quiz (30%), and a term paper (40%).

ANTH-B 600 Seminar in Bio Anthropology
Kaestle (33851)
1:00pm-3:15pm T
SB 159

ANTH-B 600 Evolution of Human Cognition
Schoenemann (6661)
2:00pm-4:15pm W
SB 060

This seminar will explore questions surrounding the origin and evolution of important aspects of human cognition and behavior. Theoretical perspectives that apply an evolutionary perspective to understanding human behavior will be discussed and critically evaluated. These have historically been controversial, as have the research programs that they inspire. This class will explore how evolutionary perspectives have informed an understanding of where our behavior comes from, why we behave the way we do, and to what extent our behavior is or has been modifiable.

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LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-L 500 Pro Seminar in Language and Culture
Graber (11368)
1:25pm-3:40pm M
GY 407

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SOCIAL-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-E 500 Pro seminar Cultural & Social Anthropology
Gilley (30479)
2:30pm-4:45pm T
ED 1204

A survey of major theoretical movements in anthropology from the 1970s to the present.  The course will focus on student understanding of the major theories, their impact on research and the controversies created by different theoretical shifts.  It will also cover the critical turn in anthropology which is now responsible for the focus on structural inequality, neoliberalism and other forms of ‘dark anthropology.

ANTH-E 600 Seminar Cultural and Social Anthropology: Peoples & Culture of the Midwest
Shahrani (30485)
1:00pm-2:15pm T
SB 060

ANTH-E 600 Seminar Cultural and Social Anthropology: Research Design and Proposal Writing
King / Brondizio (30448)
10:10am-12:25pm M
SB 060

1. Students will prepare a competitive research proposal that can be submitted to an agency or foundation for doctoral dissertation research. To do so, students will compose multiple drafts of each of the relevant sections of a grant proposal for submission, review, and resubmission on a weekly basis.
2. Students will become familiar with major funding agencies, and their diverse ways of announcing funding opportunities, and the procedures and style of submission that are unique to some of the major ones.
3. Students will learn about problem-oriented research, how to frame a research question, selecting appropriate sampling strategies, how to create and manage data, and how to operationalize a research strategy. Student will understand how social scientists reconcile their traditional methods of site-specific research with the demands placed upon them by agendas that expect research to have broader significance. Using student proposals as examples, the course reviews the methodologies used by anthropologists, including especially social-cultural anthropologists and archaeologists.
4. Students will understand how review panels are constituted, how the review process works, and how to engage in the process of revise and resubmit in order to be responsive to reviewers and address limitations of submitted proposals and constantly improve them.
5. Students will become familiar with IU administrative offices and resources related to grant preparation and grant management, and will understand the process of human subject’s approval and proposal management.

ANTH-E 600 Seminar Cultural and Social Anthropology
Shahrani (30487)
4:00pm-6:30pm R
WH 118

ANTH-E 600 Seminar Cultural & Social Anthropology: India List & Found Thru Film
Seizer (33760)
2:30pm-4:00pm M PH 10
5:15pm-9:00pm W SB 150

           This course focuses on the films of Indian diasporic filmmakers from the 1980s to the present. In these films India and South Asian diasporic culture more broadly are both harshly critiqued and fiercely loved. Drawing on their own and others’ experiences of displacement and difference, the filmmakers whose work we consider offer powerful political provocations as well as historical testimony. Their films invite cultural critique and foster debate concerning the success of India as a modern and ‘modernizing’ nation, and the politics of treating Indian culture itself as something akin to an iconic commodity that bespeaks ‘tradition.’
            Our approach to this material will be ethnographic and historical: we focus on the social and cultural context of the actions, events, places and personages that figure centrally in these films and the stories they tell. The focus of the films themselves spans colonial and postcolonial periods, and our readings focus accordingly on continuities between the cultural critiques made from afar and from within India during these respective eras. As gender inequalities continue to figure prominently in critiques of Indian postcolonial modernity, we will pay special attention to the representation of gender roles in the films.
            The course has as its conceptual centerpiece the films of two prolific feminist filmmakers who have produced highly acclaimed and controversial films over the last two decades, Mira Nair and Deepa Mehta. While theirs are not the only films we will screen, a primary aim of the course is to develop students’ cultural and filmic literacy to the point where you can appreciate the power of these films as interventions into the gendered realities of Indian and diasporic South Asian culture. To this end we will view several touchstone films from other directors and moments in Indian film history.

ANTH-E 606 Res Meth in Cultural Anthropology
Osterhoudt (8730)
2:30pm-4:45pm W
SY 0013

This seminar will introduce students to research methods, with an emphasis on qualitative methodologies and ethnography. We will consider the multiple stages of designing and carrying out research: defining a field site, formulating a research question, choosing appropriate methodologies, navigating fieldwork, and analyzing and writing up data. We will also discuss ethics of field research, and ways to share research results both with your fieldwork communities and with the broader public.

ANTH-E 646 Anthropology of Democracy
Gershon (30482)
10:10am-12:25pm W
SB 050

A course designed to help students analyze the cultural foundations of democracy.  The central theme will be the cultural dilemmas involved in exporting democracy.   The course relies on ethnographic case studies of legislatures, voting, polling, civil society and other elements democracy theorists have argued are crucial for democracies to succeed.  We analyze how these democratic practices presuppose certain forms of social organization, and explore the consequences of introducing these practices into communities organized differently.   The goals of this course are twofold.  First, students learn to think in detail about the practices that support or are implied by democratic values.  Second, students also develop a complex understanding of how social hierarchies and political organization affect what political strategies are possible.

ANTH-E 674 Res Meth in Cultural Anthropology
Sterling (13206)
1:00pm-2:15pm MW
SB 220

Cultural anthropologists have been increasingly engaged in dialogue over the relationship between “universal” human rights and “cultural relativist” respect for local culture. Framed in these terms, “The Anthropology of Human Rights” investigates the discipline’s theoretical and practical engagements with global social justice. The course examines a number of documents and theoretical texts central to the development of the notion of human rights. In light of these works, it explores several case studies oriented around such historical and contemporary human rights issues as colonialism and imperialism; refugees’ experiences; indigenous peoples, children’s and women’s rights; genocide; and development and corporate transnationalism. The course incorporates journalistic, documentary, and other resources to inform discussion of assigned readings.

ANTH-G 599 Thesis Research
Sept (4628)

ANTH-G 901 Research
Sept (1587)

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